Listen weekdays from 1-3pm ET
(No audio? Try our help)
Recent shows | More media

Listen Live: Mon-Fri 1-3pm ET

Posted: 4:01 p.m. Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Why Malt O Meal Is Not Among The Cheapest Cereal Brands

  • comment(11)



By Melissa King, Contributor

ClarkHoward.com


When it comes to saving money, every penny counts. There are a plethora of different ways in which families can save money on their groceries, but sometimes the myths and assumptions about food pricing, especially when it comes to brand names and organics, can actually deter shoppers away from some of the biggest savings.

For example, one major myth found right in the breakfast aisle is that Malt-O-Meal cereals (you know, the ones that come in the large bags) are the most cost effective choice, as compared to the other boxed cereal brands.

Check out these 3 free apps to earn cash back on your groceries.

Truthfully, the MOM brand is actually one of the most expensive cereal brands on the market. With thoughtful planning and the convenient help of manufacturer’s coupons, shoppers can save an extensive amount of money on the most popular cereal brands like Kellogg’s and General Mills. In fact, the most savvy shoppers are usually able to snag this grocery item for just a few cents, if not, completely free.

Battle of the cereal brands: Malt O Meal vs. Cheerios

First, let’s take a look at the MOM options so there is a starting point from which to compare prices. For the sake of simplicity, Walmart advertises a variety of MOM cereals ranging in price from $4.98-$5.98. These bags also range in size from approximately 32-38 ounces. (Realistic price comparisons should always take into account the weight of the product being purchased!)

Obviously, store sales, regional prices, and manufacturer coupon availability will certainly influence the level of savings that one might experience; however, there are plenty of ways that shoppers all across the nation can snag name cereal brands for much less than the MOM brand.

Currently, Walmart also advertises their General Mill’s brand Cheerios Protein boxes (14.1 ounces) at $2.98. Using a $1 off manufacturer coupon for each box, which can be found on the General Mill’s website, shoppers can snag 2 boxes of this particular type of cereal, which provides more than 1 bag of MOM, for just $3.96.

Harris Teeter has an exclusive stock up and save price of 5 boxes for $9 on several types of Kellogg’s cereal. A typical Kellogg’s manufacturer coupon will usually be anywhere from 50 cents to $1 off. Hypothetically speaking, if a 50 cents off coupon for each box was used, one of those boxes would now cost $1.30. It would take 3 boxes to equal the same volume of the Malt-O-Meal brand, but the price of the Kellogg’s would still be $3.90.

Technically, Harris Teeter will double coupons with a face value up to $0.99 each day, so taking that into consideration, one box of cereal would now cost less than $1 a piece. Even without the stock up and save pricing of Harris Teeter, other grocery stores frequently feature a buy one get one free (BOGO) sale in which each item will ring up half price. With a coupon for each of those items, the savings can be phenomenal.

See 6 Things To Do With Your Milk Before It Expires

But wait, there’s more. Several grocery stores occasionally feature super double and triple coupon savings which allow shoppers to save even more money. With these limited coupon events paired with sale pricing, even the name brands that are traditionally assumed to be more expensive than others can be purchased for dirt cheap—if not completely free.

The Malt-O-Meal brand has a reputation for value because they save money on skimpy packaging and stuff is always cheaper in bulk…right? Yet as I've shown, it doesn’t always come at the most affordable price. In fact, it’s not always best to assume that name brand items cannot be purchased for less!

About the author: Melissa King, a Savings.com DealPro, lives in Savannah, GA. She enjoys "Paying It Forward"  in her community. Check her out on her blog at ThisMommySavesMoney.com.

  • comment(11)